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Map of Columbus, Georgia, in 1886
The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world. The Geography and Map Division of the library “has custody of the largest and most comprehensive cartographic collection in the world with collections numbering over 5.5 million maps, 80,000 atlases, 6,000 reference works, over 500 globes and globe gores, 3,000 raised relief models, and […] Read more – ‘Map of Columbus, Georgia, in 1886’.
Who Cares About the American Grid?: An Analysis of 2013 Website Data
It has been another great year for the Great American Grid! In 2013, the site had 9,259 visits (+45% compared to 2012), 18,529 pageviews (+44%), and visits from 110 different countries (that’s 54% of all the countries in the world). Read on as I parse the numbers for a continued look at who cares about […] Read more – ‘Who Cares About the American Grid?: An Analysis of 2013 Website Data’.
Map of Omaha, Nebraska, in 1868
The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world. The Geography and Map Division of the library “has custody of the largest and most comprehensive cartographic collection in the world with collections numbering over 5.5 million maps, 80,000 atlases, 6,000 reference works, over 500 globes and globe gores, 3,000 raised relief models, and […] Read more – ‘Map of Omaha, Nebraska, in 1868’.
Map of Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1889
The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world. The Geography and Map Division of the library “has custody of the largest and most comprehensive cartographic collection in the world with collections numbering over 5.5 million maps, 80,000 atlases, 6,000 reference works, over 500 globes and globe gores, 3,000 raised relief models, and […] Read more – ‘Map of Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1889’.
Benefits of the Grid
During the Great American Grid Debate at CNU 21, Kevin Klinkenberg and I sparred valiantly together to defend the grid’s honor against our arch-nemeses Howard Blackson and Bill Dennis. Dozens of spectators observed us as if we were gladiators battling to the death. In the end no one died, but we bickered as if our […] Read more – ‘Benefits of the Grid’.
Salt Lake City Interrotta: Design Submissions
Coinciding with CNU 21, Salt Lake City Interrotta was an ideas competition organized right here at The Great American Grid. The competition charged participants to design an entire 660′x660′ (10 acre) block. Twenty-eight submissions were received from both students and professionals. While most of the entries were developed in America, two of them came from […] Read more – ‘Salt Lake City Interrotta: Design Submissions’.
The Great American Grid Debate at CNU 21
During CNU 21 in Salt Lake City, six urbanists will face off in a Lincoln-Douglas style battle to forever settle the Great Grid Debate. Nowhere in the world is the grid as expansive as the US West. As our cities urbanize we will need more design tools to continue redeveloping and intensifying our still young […] Read more – ‘The Great American Grid Debate at CNU 21’.
Salt Lake City Interrotta: An Ideas Competition
You have just been selected to participate in an ideas competition which is open exclusively to those who finish reading this sentence. Congratulations and thank you for your forthcoming entry. The 21st Congress for the New Urbanism will be May 29 to June 1 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the hometown of the Mormon grid. […] Read more – ‘Salt Lake City Interrotta: An Ideas Competition’.
Map of Seattle, Washington, in 1878
The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world. The Geography and Map Division of the library “has custody of the largest and most comprehensive cartographic collection in the world with collections numbering over 5.5 million maps, 80,000 atlases, 6,000 reference works, over 500 globes and globe gores, 3,000 raised relief models, and […] Read more – ‘Map of Seattle, Washington, in 1878’.
Map of Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1872
The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world. The Geography and Map Division of the library “has custody of the largest and most comprehensive cartographic collection in the world with collections numbering over 5.5 million maps, 80,000 atlases, 6,000 reference works, over 500 globes and globe gores, 3,000 raised relief models, and […] Read more – ‘Map of Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1872’.
Who Cares About the American Grid?: An Analysis of 2012 Website Data
This was the first full calendar year for The Great American Grid after it went live at the end of 2011. The site statistics for 2012 are in. The totals include 6,378 visits (123 visits per week) in 96 different countries–from Albania to Zimbabwe. In this article I parse the numbers to try and see […] Read more – ‘Who Cares About the American Grid?: An Analysis of 2012 Website Data’.
William Bridges’s Map of Manhattan, 1814
In 1811, John Randel, Jr., picked up his pen for the last time as he finished his drawing for the street plan of Manhattan. The map was filed with the city in that same year. The completion of this monumental work was no easy task. Surveying an area of 34 square miles would prove difficult […] Read more – ‘William Bridges’s Map of Manhattan, 1814’.
Map of Lima, Peru in 1750
I know this is not the USA, but it is our southern continental neighbor. During a perusal of the internet I stumbled across this beautiful map of Lima, Peru, from 1750. Interestingly, I found it within Wikipedia’s entry on the Garden city movement which reads: “Peru’s modern capital, Lima, was designed as a garden city […] Read more – ‘Map of Lima, Peru in 1750’.
The American Grid
This article has been reposted from Mike Pauls’ excellent website Recivilization. The original article may be found here. *** Hear an American voice in the wilderness, speaking to us from the year 1830. In an anonymous article in the American Journal of Science and Arts (as quoted by John Reps), the writer declares the need […] Read more – ‘The American Grid’.
Origins of the Grid
This article has been reposted from Mike Pauls’ excellent website Recivilization. The original article may be found here. *** We associate it with modern civilization, and rigid order, but in truth urge to rectangularity has appeared in peoples all over the world, in all times. Neolithic farmers in western Europe often laid out their fields […] Read more – ‘Origins of the Grid’.
What is a Block?
What is a block? Such a simple question does not seem to warrant even a blog post. After all, it is a term that has been used frequently by pretty much everyone—from Jane Jacobs to Jennifer Lopez. And block size is one of the first attributes sought by urbanists when studying a town or city. […] Read more – ‘What is a Block?’.
The Art of the Circle Field
This article was written by James W. Earl, a professor of English at the University of Oregon. It is reposted here by permission. Currently, James’ photography is on display at the Eugene, Oregon Airport through July. If you find yourself there, be sure and visit the gallery. For a few years I flew back and […] Read more – ‘The Art of the Circle Field’.
Choose the Grid? Absolutely.
Fanis Grammenos, a principal of Urban Pattern Associates, recently published an article at Planetizen.com titled “Choosing a Grid, or Not.” The article addresses the question “What should be the preferred layout for a new neighborhood?” while focusing specifically on the grid plan. I encourage you to read the article, but to summarize here are three […] Read more – ‘Choose the Grid? Absolutely.’.
Amazing Fact in the Annals of Urban History
This amazing fact comes from the Encyclopedia of Chicago: In less than the lifespan of one of Chicago’s earliest residents, Emily Beaubien Le Beau (1825–1919), Chicago grew from fewer than 100 people into being the fourth-largest city in the world. Now that’s amazing. Read more – ‘Amazing Fact in the Annals of Urban History’.
The Power and Pleasure of Grids
The following article is reposted by permission from Jarrett Walker’s blog HumanTransit.org. You can view the original post here. Why do transit planners love grids? Now and then you’ll even hear one muttering about “grid integrity” or “completing the grid.” What are they talking about? Suppose you’re designing an ideal transit system for a fairly […] Read more – ‘The Power and Pleasure of Grids’.
Fallacies Against the Grid
I have heard many criticisms about the grid plan–It’s boring, It’s unnatural, et cetera. Having happily visited and lived within gridded towns and cities I have wondered why these perceptions exist. What is so wrong with straight streets? Following, I address some common fallacies in a defense for the grid. Fallacy #1: The grid is […] Read more – ‘Fallacies Against the Grid’.
Visiting the Greatest Grid
The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan, 1811-2011 is an exhibit on display at the Museum of the City of New York through April 15, 2012. It explores the comprehensive history of Manhattan’s master street plan. Following is a review of this exhibition as well as a critique of a concurrent exhibition titled The […] Read more – ‘Visiting the Greatest Grid’.
A History of the American Grid in 4 Minutes
The grid has been used continuously throughout the world as a development pattern since Hippodamus first used it at Piraeus, Greece in the 5th century BC. A lot happened over the next 2,000 years after that, but in 1682 William Penn used the grid as the physical foundation for Philadelphia. With that, the grid began […] Read more – ‘A History of the American Grid in 4 Minutes’.
A Defense of the Grid
The following content has been reposted with permission by Charlie Gardner at Old Urbanist. To view the original post from April 4, 2011 please visit http://oldurbanist.blogspot.com/2011/04/defense-of-grid-part-i-portland-and.html A (Defense!) of the Grid: Portland and 19th Century American City Grids In a lengthy critique of Portland’s street grid, planner Fanis Grammenos argues that the grid makes inefficient […] Read more – ‘A Defense of the Grid’.
Crop Circles in Kansas
The following content has been reposted from NASA’s website. See the original post at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=5772. Resembling a work of modern art, variegated green crop circles cover what was once shortgrass prairie in southwestern Kansas. The most common crops in this region—Finney County—are corn, wheat, and sorghum. Each of these crops was at a different point […] Read more – ‘Crop Circles in Kansas’.
How Manhattan’s Grid Grew
To reveal the history of the Manhattan grid’s implementation, the New York Times has posted this interactive map. The most compelling portion of this map is found under the Street Openings tab. You can move the slider back and forth through time and see when each individual street was constructed. The display is amazing. While […] Read more – ‘How Manhattan’s Grid Grew’.